Jul 20 2021

City of Piedmont
Public Safety Committee Agenda
Thursday, July 22, 2021

5:30 p.m.
Via Teleconference

COVID 19 ADVISORY NOTICE

Consistent with Executive Orders No. N-25-20 and No. N-29-20 from the Executive Department of the State of California and the Alameda County Health Official’s Shelter in Place Order, the Public Safety Committee meeting will not be physically open to the public and committee members will be teleconferencing into the meeting via ZOOM Teleconference.To maximize public safety while still maintaining transparency and public access, members of the public can participate in the meeting in several ways:
Computer or smart phone: Click https://piedmont-ca-gov.zoom.us/j/83460292749
Telephone: Dial (669) 900-9128 and enter webinar/meeting number 834-6029-2749
To participate in the meeting by providing public comment, members of the public may use the ZOOM platform to make live, verbal public comments. To speak to the committee, click the “Raise Your Hand” button when the item on which you would like to comment is called. If you are connected to the meeting by phone, please dial *9. When it is your turn to speak, the City Clerk will call your name and unmute your line, at which point you will have three minutes to address the Committee. After the allotted time, you will then be re-muted. Instructions of how to “Raise Your Hand” is available at https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/205566129%0D-Raise-Hand-In-Webinar

Any member of the public who needs accommodations should email the City Clerk at
cityclerk@piedmont.ca.gov or call (510) 420-3040 who will make their best efforts to provide reasonable accommodations to provide as much accessibility as possible while also maintaining public safety in accordance with the City procedure for resolving reasonable accommodation requests. Information about reasonable accommodations is available on the City website at https://piedmont.ca.gov.

Call to Order  – Roll Call

Public Forum This is an opportunity for members of the audience to speak on an item not on the agenda. The 10 minute period will be divided evenly between those wishing to address the Committee.

Regular Agenda
1. Approval of Public Safety Committee Meeting Minutes for 5/27/2021
2. Update on PPD Strategic Plan
3. Update on Racial Identity Profiling Act (RIPA)
4. Update on Data Analysis of PPD Calls for Service
5. Update on ALPR & Public Safety Cameras
6. Update on Community Policing Events

7. Update on School Liaison Activities
8. Update on COVID-19 and Discussion on Related Public Safety Initiatives

Announcements, old business and consideration of future agenda items

Adjourn

Materials related to an item on this agenda submitted to the Public Safety Committee are available for public inspection in the Police Department during normal business hours.
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the City Clerk at (510) 420-3040. Notification at least two business days preceding the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting. [28 CFR 35.102-35.104 ADA Title II]. 
Jul 20 2021

The draft Piedmont Safer Streets Plan is now available for public review and comment. The City would love to hear what you think. Please send the city your comments in writing to SaferStreets@piedmont.ca.gov through Sunday, August 22, 2021.

City staff and the project consultant will give a presentation on the contents of the plan at this month’s meeting of the Piedmont Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee (PBAC). The meeting is this THURSDAY, JULY 22, at 5:30 pm. You may find the meeting agenda here.

For questions about the Piedmont Safer Streets project or about the PBAC, contact Gopika Nair (City of Piedmont), at SaferStreets@Piedmont.ca.gov or at (510) 420-3054.

Jul 19 2021

Dear Council, Staff, and Members of the Pool Advisory Committee,

My sense from last week’s Pool Advisory Committee and from speaking with Council Members is that everyone involved in this project wants a pool facility that emits as few carbon emissions as possible. But the schedule and work plan presented at last week’s Pool Advisory Committee meeting, as well as the draft RFP for a project design team before you tonight have me deeply concerned that we are not on track to do this. I believe that right now we are in danger of being lulled into a design process that is biased, inadequate, and likely to lead to failure. I urge you to send this RFP back to the drawing board and to re-evaluate the project timeline and milestones.

Piedmont’s Climate Action Plan

How we set up the design process for the pool facility now will determine whether or not we are able to make its operations as close to zero carbon as feasible. From the looks of the RFP, we aren’t making a serious attempt at all. First of all, why is there absolutely no mention of Piedmont’s 2019 Climate Action Plan in the RFP? The CAP is a guiding document for the City, developed by staff with community input and approved by Council. If we aren’t going to pay attention to it now, for the first new major municipal construction project since it was passed, why did we bother investing our time and energy to develop it? Why don’t we just admit to the world that we in Piedmont value our comfort and convenience over making a serious effort to reduce our GHG emissions? An explanation of the Climate Action Plan and Piedmont’s GHG emissions targets needs to be part of  the “Background” section of the RFP, and it needs to be made clear to potential bidders that their proposals need to clearly explain how they will approach reaching these emissions reduction targets.

2017 Conceptual Design 

Planning for serious GHG emissions reductions in line with California and Piedmont emissions reduction targets has not been part of the conversation about the new pool facility to this point — not in the conceptual design process (at least rigorously), not in the UU campaign, not in the interviews for Pool Advisory Committee members. Granted, the early stages of this process were before the completion of our 2019 CAP and before the developed world started to experience widespread and unmistakable climate disasters. Now that we know how concertedly we need to act to mitigate climate change, we cannot move forward assuming that the 2017 conceptual design is the project “bible” and that everything must be planned around it. I am very concerned, based on information presented at the first PAC meeting and in this RFP, that staff and the project management team see that conceptual design as already being locked in.

Previously, Connect was told that the 2017 conceptual design was just a placeholder and that it would be thoroughly re-done when the actual project began. However, the information presented at the PAC meeting seemed to indicate that this 2017 conceptual design is what will be taken before the public for “validation.” Since it’s old, the conceptual design doesn’t take into account the emissions reduction targets set by Piedmont’s 2019 CAP. Its “green tech” elements are simply outdated and inadequate. It proposes to accomplish 55% of the pool water heating with a solar tube array (passive solar), leaving 45% of the pool water heating to natural gas. Since the proposed new facility will triple the pool area of the old facility, the 2017 design will still lead to an increase in the facility’s natural gas usage, despite its “green tech” features. The design would significantly (likely irreparably) set back the City’s GHG emissions reduction efforts. (For more details about the problems with the 2017 conceptual design in terms of emissions reductions, see page 3 of the April report Piedmont Connect prepared at the request of the City Administrator.)

The RFP appears to deepen this problem by paving the way for an early ruling out of attempting a zero emissions design. Instead of starting the project by figuring from scratch how to design a zero emissions facility, it calls for working backwards from the (flawed) 2017 conceptual design to see if it can be made zero emissions. If this is how we go about it, the answer will likely be, “no, it’s impossible.”

If the facility is truly going to achieve as few emissions as possible, the specific emissions reduction technologies that could achieve this need to be incorporated into the conceptual design from the beginning, as the space they would occupy will be part of the space of the overall facility and thus influence its layout (these technologies would likely include high efficiency air-to-water electric heat pumps, powered by on-site solar PV, passive solar elements, etc., all of which need dedicated space). If we try to reverse our way out of the 2017 design, we are almost guaranteed failure.

Emissions Calculations

While those of us in Connect who have been analyzing the possibilities for a zero emissions facility have called for doing the emissions calculations early, we were not asking for what the RFP calls for (“an in-depth feasibility and cost/benefit analysis to determine if the facility can reach a Net Zero Energy for construction, operations and maintenance of the facility. This analysis shall be performed in the Preliminary stage of design to make an early determination of the feasibility of this goal.”). The way the thinking of project managers seems to be going, the zero net carbon features are being seen as add-ins, frills that would be nice to have, but not essential to the project. With this mindset, zero carbon technologies will be first on the chopping block when it comes to value engineering. Instead, they need to be non-negotiable, and, if value engineering is needed, some of the actual frills of the project should be what we cut until we can get to them later. A pool energy system is not something that can easily be revised later. We may need to incorporate some of the elements in stages, but we need to plan for them from the beginning.

In addition, the type of GHG emissions analysis Connect has been calling for is not a simple cost-benefit analysis. This analysis will require a separate team of experts in complex energy and emissions calculations (so this team needs to be added to the RFP’s list of consultants who will be needed). These are not calculations that a team coming at the issue from a cost/benefit perspective will have the expertise to do correctly. They will be unfamiliar with the newer technologies that will be needed in a zero carbon design, and, as such, they could easily rule them out without understanding their role.

CEQA

Another big flaw in the RFP is that the section on CEQA submittals (1.3.4.1) does not reference the GHG assessment that is now part of CEQA (as of 2019). Here’s a link to the new language: https://resources.ca.gov/CNRALegacyFiles/ceqa/docs/2018_CEQA_FINAL_TEXT_122818.pdf  

In summary, “The revision of CEQA Guidelines section 15064.4 clarified several points, including the following:

  • Lead agencies must analyze the greenhouse gas emissions of proposed projects. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (a).)
  • The focus of the lead agency’s analysis should be on the project’s effect on climate change, rather than simply focusing on the quantity of emissions and how that quantity of emissions compares to statewide or global emissions. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b).)
  • The impacts analysis of greenhouse gas emissions is global in nature and thus should be considered in a broader context. A project’s incremental contribution may be cumulatively considerable even if it appears relatively small compared to statewide, national or global emissions. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b).)
  • Lead agencies should consider a timeframe for the analysis that is appropriate for the project. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b).)
  • A lead agency’s analysis must reasonably reflect evolving scientific knowledge and state regulatory schemes. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b).)
  • Lead agencies may rely on plans prepared pursuant to section 15183.5 (Plans for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gases) in evaluating a project’s greenhouse gas emissions. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b)(3).)
  • In determining the significance of a project’s impacts, the lead agency may consider a project’s consistency with the State’s long-term climate goals or strategies, provided that substantial evidence supports the agency’s analysis of how those goals or strategies address the project’s incremental contribution to climate change and its conclusion that the project’s incremental contribution is consistent with those plans, goals, or strategies. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (b)(3).)
  • The lead agency has discretion to select the model or methodology it considers most appropriate to enable decision makers to intelligently take into account the project’s incremental contribution to climate change. (See CEQA Guidelines, § 15064.4, subd. (c).)

LEED Certification

In the RFP and in the project management team’s presentation at the PAC meeting, when LEED certification was brought up, it was made to sound like LEED would apply to the entire facility. In my understanding, there’s no LEED certification system for pool water heating systems (I’d love to be proved wrong). LEED may perhaps apply to the pool structure, but it’s the pool water heating that will be by far the major source of the facility’s GHG emissions (unless we eliminate natural gas usage). It’s disingenuous (greenwashing) to label the entire facility as LEED certified, if this leaves out the major source of GHG emissions. In addition, for the structural elements of the pool (such as the pool house), why would we limit ourselves to LEED Silver? Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum LEED standards are older standards and mainly focused on energy efficiency and sustainable building materials. We should be aiming, instead, for the newer LEED Zero Carbon standard, which accounts for energy sources and verifies net zero goals. We strongly urge you to aim for LEED Zero Carbon, for the applicable parts of the project. Even if we can’t reach LEED Zero Carbon in the end, we need to set an ambitious goal to start with, rather than admitting defeat from the beginning.

This can be a pool facility for the 21st century, if we put our minds and wills to it. It’s time to pause and re-do the design team RFP as well as the project work plan and timeline.

Margaret Ovenden, Piedmont Resident

Jul 4 2021

FREE Camp Khan summer Challenge for kids to complete 15-minutes of Math Daily.

The online summer camp is available to start anytime in July.

“Our program will focus you on the exact math skills that matter the most, setting you up for success in the next school year, while prioritizing SUMMER. After the 15 minutes of math are over and the device is tucked away, we’ll provide you with some fun activity ideas, boredom busters, and lots of chances to win cool prizes.”

Get started:

  1. Figure out what to focus on to help you prepare for next year’s math class. You might brush up on something difficult from last year or tackle an entirely new topic! Talk to your teacher or with your family and commit!
  2. Navigate to the topic or grade level you’re working towards in Khan Academy’s “Get Ready” courses, and take the course challenge. This will help you breeze past skills you’re already comfortable with, so your 15 minutes of practice are spent getting stronger. #worksmarter

Camp Khan Kids  for children ages 2–8.

Camp Khan Kids  guides parents and children in a playful educational journey using the Khan Academy Kids app as a launchpad into hands-on learning. Families will receive a weekly calendar of online and offline activities to spark imagination, play, and learning. It’s easy to use and adapt for your family; start at any time, choose any mix of activities that you like, and progress at your own pace. Activities cover reading, writing, math, logic, creative play, and social-emotional development. Weekly activity themes for 2021 include dinosaurs, space, science, and wild animals.
Camp Khan Kids takes place July 5-31, 2021. For more information, visit the overview page: khan.co/CampKhanKids2021
May 25 2021

The Piedmont Public Safety Committee will hold a Zoom meeting on Thursday, May 27 at 5:30 pm.  Click the Agenda below for participation details and draft minutes of the Committee’s March meeting. 

PSC Agenda 2021-05-27

Public Safety 2021-03-25 DRAFT

May 16 2021

Award winner Ken Li, Piedmont Community Service Crew founder and adviser, was presented with this year’s Arthur Hecht Volunteer of the Year Award at the May 12th, 2021. Board of Education meeting.

The award is presented each year to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the community and to Piedmont’s youth through volunteer service over a period of many years.

Art Hecht was well known as a volunteer dedicated to serving students in Piedmont and Oakland. He was a member of Piedmont’s Board of Education from 1970 to 1982, and instrumental in developing Millennium High School, Piedmont’s alternative high school.  Established in 1998, the Arthur Hecht Award honors both Hecht’s memory and extraordinary individuals who continue his legacy of service.

Mr. Li has been an active volunteer since 1998 with several groups such as, the Boy and Girl Scouts of America, Piedmont Community Service Crew, Piedmont Service Group for Middle School, Piedmont Food and Cooking Crew, and High Adventure Group.

“Most every weekend throughout the year, if you showed up at the Tiny House Empowerment Village, St. Mary’s Senior Center, Native Plant Nursery, or a Rebuild Together Oakland family home site you might find Ken Li behind the camera photographing his students painting, cooking, or planting. What you won’t see is the thousands of hours Ken spends planning events, coordinating with community groups, mentoring students, recruiting youth and parent volunteers, and rolling up his sleeves to work side-by-side with students,” commented Jen Cavenaugh, Piedmont Parent and City Council Member.

“Ken’s positive impact on the Piedmont and surrounding community is evident by the large number of nominations he received,” commented Randy Booker, Superintendent. “He is well-deserving of this award and exemplifies a true heart of service to students everywhere.”

Mr. Li was presented with an art piece created by PHS AP Art Student Eleanor Andersen.

Mar 23 2021

PIEDMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD MEETING – March 24, 2021

 Update for on campus instruction – Spring and Fall

  • Negotiations continue for Spring on campus instruction.  
  • Fall 2021 – The Board of Education and the Piedmont Unified School District is planning for providing full-time, on-campus instruction for the 2021-2022 school year.  Read the staff report in the link below.

>VII_B_BackgroundOnCampusInstructionSpring2021AndFall2021_0

  • $10,000,000 in School Bonds: The bonds were awarded to the bidder providing the lowest true interest cost (TIC), which represents the interest to be repaid by taxpayers. The bids also include a premium to cover the costs of the sale so that the net amount received by the District is $10 million. Of the seven bids received, Fidelity Capital Markets had the lowest TIC at 2.1268%. The costs of issuance total $146,440, not including the compensation to the underwriters. Costs include fees paid to the bond counsel, financial advisor, rating agency and other miscellaneous costs related to the bond sale. These costs, as well as any underwriting costs or commissions are included in the TIC because they are paid from premium generated when the underwriters sell the bonds to investors. The competitive sale ensures that the bonds were sold at the lowest possible cost.

>VII_A_BackgroundResultsOfSaleSeries2021C

_0VII_A_PresentationPostSaleSummary_0

  • InterDistrict Transfers – Updated 

VIII_A_UpdatedBPAR5117InterDistrictTransferAttendance

  • Theater and STEAM Building Updates

VIII_B_BackgroundSTEAMTheaterGMP_0

  • Agenda and more links > HERE

Mar 23 2021

Public Safety Committee Agenda –  Thursday, March 25, 2021 5:30 p.m. Via Teleconference

Because of COVID-19 protocols Piedmonters have an opportunity to view updates on Piedmont Public Safety issues from home.  Previously, the meetings of this Committee were not video recorded.  Interested individuals needed to actually attend a meeting to learn what transpired.

Regular Agenda

1. Approval of Public Safety Committee Meeting Minutes for 1/21/2021

2. Update on Police Department Strategic Plan

3. Update on Public Safety Cameras

4. Update on Juvenile Officer

5. Update on School Liaison Activities

6. Update on COVID 19 & Health Order

7. Update on Piedmont Fire Department Strategic Planning

Read instructions for meeting viewing and participation by clicking below

PSC Agenda 2021-03-25  

READ prior minutes Public Safety 2021-01-21 DRAFT

Mar 9 2021

– Student transfers from other School Districts into the Piedmont School District are proposed on a priority basis.   Children of persons working 10 hours or more per week in Piedmont need no longer work for the City or School District and grandchildren of Piedmont residents will continue to be prioritized.

Expanded qualifications for enrollment in Piedmont Schools will be considered on March 10.

Three separate initiatives were discussed during a February 24th School Board meeting in order to help achieve the Board’s goal:

1. PUSD Athletic Coaches: Paid contracted athletic coaches [children] may be eligible for admittance to Piedmont schools based on verification of employment. Does not pertain to volunteer coaches. When a District Coach ceases employment with the District, he/she shall withdraw his/her child from the District no later than the end of the current semester or at the discretion of the Superintendent.

2. Persons Employed Within the City of Piedmont: Limits Children of Persons physically employed at least 10 hours a week within the City of Piedmont limits may be eligible for admittance to Piedmont schools. Proof of employment via a letter on employer’s stationary verifying schedule (hours and days) and location of employment and a copy of a current pay stub must accompany the application. When the person ceases employment within the City of Piedmont limits, he/she shall withdraw his/her child from the District no later than the end of the current semester or at the discretion of the Superintendent.

3. Children of the City of Piedmont Government Employees The District may admit children of City of Piedmont government employees employed at least 10 hours a week. A City government employee is defined as an employee who is on a regularly scheduled City of Piedmont government employee payroll on which appropriate deductions occur. It does not include consultants or contractors for the City of Piedmont.

Read the proposed priorities for admittance in the links below:

IX_B_BackgroundBPAR5117_0

IX_B_UpdatedBPAR5117InterDistrictTransferAttendance_0

To participate in this Agenda item on March 10, 2021, at the 7 pm, Piedmont Unified School District meeting, click the Agenda below:

https://agendaonline.net/public/Meeting.aspx?AgencyID=1241&MeetingID=82620&AgencyTypeID=1&IsArchived=False

Mar 9 2021

The League of Women Voters of Piedmont is sponsoring its second annual essay contest open to all high school juniors and seniors who are residents of Piedmont or are currently enrolled in Piedmont High School or Millennium High School.

Prize: $500 for first place essay; prize may be split among the top two entries.

Contest Rules Content: Your essay should answer the question,

“Given the fragility of democracy as evidenced by the insurrection of January 6, 2021, how can your generation work to ensure that democracy in the United States is strengthened for future generations?”

You may, but are not required to, rely on outside sources that are properly cited within the text and in a bibliography. We do not require a specific format for your citations or bibliography, but please ensure you include enough information to allow us to readily verify your sources. Citations do not count toward your total number of words.

Please keep in mind that this essay is not solely a research paper, but should draw on your personal experiences and insights. Your essay will be judged on originality, clarity of expression, vocabulary and style, proper grammar, punctuation and spelling. Students are encouraged to have a teacher, parent or mentor review the essay prior to submission keeping in mind that all work must be the student’s own.

The essay must be 250-500 words excluding citations. Entries must be typed, double-spaced and in pdf format. Please include the following information at the top of your essay or on a separate cover page: : Your essay should answer the question, “Given the fragility of democracy as evidenced by the insurrection of January 6, 2021, how can your generation work to ensure that democracy in the United States is strengthened for future generations?”  See details below.

Format: The essay must be 250-500 words excluding citations. Entries must be typed, double-spaced and in pdf format. Please include the following information at the top of your essay or on a separate cover page:

• title of essay

• your first and last name

• your city of residence

• name of your school

• your current grade (junior or senior)

Submission: Please submit completed essays via email to lwvpiedmont@gmail.com.

Deadline: April 17, 2021 at 11:59pm, Pacific Standard Time.

Winner will be notified by May 1st, 2021.

Read flyer below:

ESSAY CONTEST