Aug 6 2020

“…less disruptive than the recently proposed City ordinances (aka Reach Codes) to disband natural-gas appliances.”

A simple way for the City of Piedmont to reduce greenhouse gases (GNG) would be to enforce its existing ordinance that bans gasoline-powered leaf blowers, voluntarily direct city workers to cease using gasoline-powered leaf blowers, and to implement hefty fines for failure to abide.   According to the California Air Resource Board (CARB) 1 hour of gas powered leaf blower use is equivalent to 1,100 auto miles.  Gasoline powered lawn mowers produce about 25% of the GNG that leaf blowers do.

This approach to reducing GNG is far easier and much less disruptive than the recently proposed City ordinances (aka Reach Codes) to disband natural-gas appliances.   And it would greatly reduce Piedmont’s noise pollution as well.

Dai Meagher, Piedmont Resident

Aug 2 2020

All Piedmont properties are potentially impacted.

A first reading of a newly proposed ordinance for vegetation controls for all Piedmont properties will be considered Monday, August 3, 2020, 6:00 p.m., by the Piedmont City Council.

The proposed fire code ordinance broadens requirements to include all of Piedmont, rather than specifically identified high fire hazard areas.  California state law requires property owners in high fire hazard, wildland-urban border areas to maintain a 30 feet of open space cleared of vegetable fuel surrounding their homes, barns, garages and other structures. 

The vast majority of Piedmont dwellings do not have a 30 foot open space perimeter between their homes, so it is not possible to have 30 feet of defensible space as specified in the ordinance. The City policy of allowing reductions in distances between neighboring structures presents a fire safety threat unaddressed in the ordinance.

Piedmont’s Park Commission, Planning Commission, and Public Safety Committee have not been presented as advisors with the ordinance prior to the Council consideration. Landscaping, planting choices, and safety are regularly agendized by the commissions and committee. 

“The City’s recommendations were developed with extensive research by staff including consultation with the State Fire Marshal’s Office as well as CalFIRE Planning and Land-use personnel. The specific elements of the Fuel Reduction and Vegetation Management standards were developed from National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the California Fire Code, and extensive review of policies and practices from other regional jurisdictions as noted in Attachment B.” City Administrator report linked below

Items included in the proposed new ordinance:

a. Cut down, remove, or reduce any hazardous vegetation or combustible material. Hazardous vegetation or combustible materials include, but are not limited to weeds, grass, vines, leaves, brush, diseased or dead trees, combustible growth, debris, or rubbish capable of being ignited and endangering property.

b. Maintain a defensible space of at least 30 feet from the perimeter of each building or structure located on a parcel. The size of the defensible space area may be increased or decreased by the fire code official based on site-specific analysis of local conditions, which include, but are not limited to, considerations of: the size of the property, whether the property is located on a steep slope, whether property located in an exposed windswept location, the fire risk that the vegetation surrounding the property poses, the proximity of adjacent structures and risk to such adjacent structures, and whether the vegetation surrounding the property is regularly maintained or pruned. A responsible person is not required to manage vegetation located beyond the property line of the subject parcel.

c. Maintain any space that is within 3 feet from a roadway clear of any flammable vegetation, and maintain a 15-foot vertical clearance, free of vegetation, above roadways including streets, driveways and rights-of-way.

d. Remove or trim any vegetation that is deemed by the Fire Marshal to impede emergency vehicle access.

e. Remove all portions of trees within 10 feet of functioning chimneys or stovepipe outlets.

f. Maintain the roof and gutters free of leaves, needles, or other dead/dying wood.

g. Remove brush and tree limbs that are within six feet of the ground from mature trees.

h. Remove flammable vegetation and limbs from trees that may pose a fire and/or safety hazard to the home or property.

i. Install a spark arrestor on functioning chimneys or stovepipe outlets.

2. Vacant parcels. For any vacant parcel in the city, each responsible person for such parcel shall ensure that vegetation on the parcel is maintained in accordance with the requirements below. Each responsible person shall: Attachment A Agenda Report

a. For parcels with an acreage that is 0.5 acres or less, the responsible person shall clear the entire lot of flammable vegetation and maintain it to a height of 6 inches or less.

b. For parcels with an acreage that is greater than 0.5 acres, clear the area that is one hundred feet along the perimeter of the property line of flammable vegetation and maintain such vegetation to a height of 6 inches or less. A responsible person is not required to manage vegetation located beyond the property line.

c. Maintain any space that is within 3 feet from a roadway clear of any flammable vegetation, and maintain a 15 foot vertical clearance, free of vegetation above roadways including streets, driveways and rights-of-way.

d. Remove flammable vegetation and limbs from trees that may pose a fire and/or safety hazard from the property.

e. Remove brush and tree limbs that are within six feet of the ground from mature trees.

3. Penalties. Violations of this section shall be subject to penalties. Penalty amount may be established by resolution of the City Council. If penalty amounts have not been established by resolution of the City Council, violations of this section shall be punishable by fine in the amounts specified in Government Code section 51185.

8.14.060 Definitions. In this division:

Defensible Space means the area adjacent to a structure or dwelling where wildfire prevention or protection practices are implemented to provide defense from an approaching wildfire or to minimize the spread of a structure fire to wildlands or surrounding areas, as provided in Government Code section 51177(a).

Flammable vegetation means: (1) vegetation, brush, or grasses, which is dry, dead, or dying and which is over six inches in height; or (2) vegetation which has a high resin or sap content including but not limited to Arborvitae, California Bay, Cedar, Cypress, Douglas Fir, Eucalyptus, Fir, Juniper, Palm, Pine, Spruce, Yew, California buckwheat, California sagebrush, Chamise or greasewood, Laurel sumac, Manzanita, Pampas grass, Rosemary, Scotch broom, Spanish Broom, Sugar bush, and Toyon and which is over six inches in height.

Responsible person means any natural person or a corporate entity that is the owner, occupant, lessor, lessee, manager, licensee, or other person having physical or legal control over a structure or parcel of land.

READ > Designating Very High Fire Severity Zones and Adding Additional Fuel Reduction and Vegetation Management Requirements to the City Code 

Oakland’s approach.

Oakland homes adjacent to the East Bay Regional Parklands are instructed to:

30 feet of Lean, Clean and Green

  • Remove all dead plants, grass, weeds and overgrown brush.
  • Clean leaves, needles, and debris from roofs and rain gutters.
  • Keep tree branches 10 feet away from chimney, roof and other trees.
  • Move firewood and fuel tanks 30 feet from house.
  • Remove all items from under deck. Do not use this space for storage.
  • Fire harden your home. Install fine wire mesh over roof, eave and foundation vents.

Piedmont does not border on East Bay Regional Parklands.  Oakland provides an exception for specimens of trees, ornamental shrubbery, and ornamental ground cover even on the Wildlife-Urban border.

City of Oakland Section 4907 Defensible Space – Amend Section 4907 as follows:

Add: 4907.2 Defensible Space. Persons owning, leasing, controlling, operating or maintaining buildings or structures in, upon or adjoining the Wildland-Urban Interface Fire Area and persons owning, leasing or controlling land adjacent to such buildings or structures, shall:

Maintain an effective 30-foot defensible space by removing and clearing away flammable vegetation and combustible growth from structures.

Exception: Single specimens of trees, ornamental shrubbery or similar plants used as ground covers, provided that they do not form a means of rapidly transmitting fire from the native growth to any structure.

_____________

READ the proposed Piedmont ordinance below:

Introduction and 1st Reading of Ord. 755 N.S. Designating Very High Fire Severity Zones and Adding Additional Fuel Reduction and Vegetation Management Requirements to the City Code
AGENDA https://piedmont.ca.gov/UserFiles/Servers/Server_13659739/File/Government/City%20Council/Agenda/council-current-agenda.pdf
Jul 30 2020

Piedmont would become the first city in California to require existing residences to make retrofits when spending $25,000 on home improvement projects, including kitchen or bath updates.   Berkeley and San Francisco require all electric for new construction, but not for existing homes.

July 20, 2020 was the first time the Council had considered the proposed REACH CODE ordinance.

In a split vote, three City Council members, Vice Mayor Teddy King, Councilmember Jennifer Cavenaugh, and Councilmember Tim Rood, approved the first reading of the REACH energy program designed to wean Piedmonters off of natural gas.  Mayor Robert McBain and Councilmember Betsy Andersen voted against the first reading of the comprehensive ordinance.    Older buildings undergoing a major remodel or new buildings will be the most impacted by the new ordinance.   The second and final reading of the proposed ordinance was expected for August 3, 2020, however the REACH codes are not on the agenda for that meeting.

On its website for days prior to the Piedmont meeting, the Sierra Club stated,  “All Alameda County residents are urged to join this virtual public meeting to give public comment in support of this electrification ordinance. Building electrification is an essential strategy to curb climate and air pollution.”  Sierra Club speakers did participate at the July 20 meeting.  The Sierra Club opposes cooking with gas, not only in homes, but also in restaurants.

The propane gas industry sent two speakers, and various individuals who helped develop the proposed ordinance encouraged the Council to improve it or adopt the ordinance as proposed. 

One or more speakers were less enthusiastic and raised issues of costs, practicality for life conditions, and concerns over commercial and municipal property not being included.  One speaker stated, “It seems the city should start with their own facilities.” 

Councilmember Andersen questioned why the ordinance had not been reviewed by the Planning Commission stating this would give the residents of Piedmont a greater opportunity to consider and participate in the omnibus ordinance impacting Piedmont homes. Additional, information was requested regarding the cost impact to homeowners.

Mayor McBain was concerned that the $25,000 threshold for ordinance compliance was too low and suggested a higher possible $50,000 threshold.

Rood, Cavenaugh, and King praised the staff for involving the public in outreach to form the comprehensive ordinance meeting Piedmont’s Climate Action Plan goals.  There were no changes made to the proposed ordinance provisions, and the ordinance first reading was approved as proposed by the three affirmative votes.

Unresolved questions raised by the public and council were:

  • What is considered cost-effective?
  • Why wasn’t the Planning Commission asked to review the ordinance?
  • What exceptions are allowed under the ordinance?
  • Why are the exceptions not included in the ordinance?
  • Will the Planning and Building staff be making the exception decisions?
  • Was specific consideration given to Piedmont’s many older homes ill fitted for retrofits?
  • Where would the required heat pump be placed on a property?
  • What happens to homes heated by radiators or radiant heat?
  • Why are City, School, and commercial buildings excluded from the ordinance requirements?
  • Should City facilities set the example first and then require homes to comply?
  • Is a 30 year amortization period realistic for expensive energy improvements?
  • What is the expected cost for required improvements of various ages and sizes of homes?
  • Will homeowners be discouraged from making improvements because of significant added costs or evade city permits?
  • What happens if your furnace goes out in the middle of winter and you do not have time to install a required solar system?
  • How much will it cost to administer the ordinance?
  • How was it determined that $25,000 on improvements, such as a new kitchen, would trigger ordinance compliance?

READ the 2020 Ordinance 1st Reading of Ords. 750 & 751 NS Reach Codes & Energy Audit Policy

Piedmont staff described the specific proposed requirements as follows:

  • Newly constructed low-rise residential buildings, including new detached accessory dwelling units (ADUs), must use all electric building appliances.
  • Projects proposing an entire new upper level on a low-rise residential building, or that increase a low-rise residential building’s total roof area by 30% or more, are required to install solar panels on their roof.
  • A housing renovation on a low-rise residential building, that costs $25,000 or more, will require the applicant to include one item from a list of energy efficient insulation or electrification fixes (renovations of $100,000 or more must include two). Multiple items are cost-effective.

The City Council also considered other amendments to the Building Code and policy changes that, while not Reach Codes,  help reduce natural gas use. They are:

  • An application for an electrical panel upgrade must include space in the panel to accommodate future electrification of all building appliances.
  • Kitchen and laundry area renovations must include electrical outlets to allow for future electrification.
  • Requiring completion of a Home Energy Score or Audit (homeowner’s choice) when listing for sale of a property or submitting an application for a design review permit.

Proposed Title 24 amendments (“Reach Codes”), the City Council were considered at the July 20 Council meeting. The first reading was on July 20 and the second reading was expected on August 3, yet is not on the agenda. 

At its regular meeting on July 20th, the Piedmont City Council considered the first reading of an ordinance implementing reach codes, which are amendments to state’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards and state Electrical Code which are designed to promote efficient building methods in homes in Piedmont. The Council considered an ordinance requiring home energy audits under certain circumstances. Click to read the Agenda Report for this item, which includes the proposed ordinances, as well as links to background documents and details on the public outreach. The agenda report and Ordinance 750 N.S. were updated and posted effective July 15, 2020. The update includes typographical corrections in the report and the inclusion of amendments to City Code section 8.02.020 in the ordinance.

The Council was slated to take this issue up at its meeting of July 6th, but due to the importance of the issue and the lateness of the hour, decided to continue consideration to its July 20th regular meeting when a first reading of the ordinance was approved.

These measures are being proposed because Piedmont’s Climate Action Plan (CAP) 2.0 calls for the community to reduce its annual greenhouse gas emissions from the building, transportation, waste, and wastewater sectors, combined, from about 38,000 metric tons of CO2e in 2017 to just 9,800 metric tons in 2050. Currently, a large percentage of Piedmont’s emissions come from natural gas appliances in buildings, especially gas furnaces and water heaters. To meet CAP goals, the Piedmont community must decrease natural gas use in buildings by improving insulation, and by switching out natural gas appliances for electric appliances powered by renewable energy.

Read complete City of Piedmont press release here.

First Reading approved by the City Council >  – 2020 Ordinance 1st Reading of Ords. 750 & 751 NS Reach Codes & Energy Audit Policy

Jul 30 2020

A significant percentage of Piedmonters are out of town and are unaware of the impacts.

 Dear Piedmonters,

I appeal to you to join me in lobbying our elected city leaders for an extension of time (beyond August 3rd) for the  second reading of the recently proposed Ordinances 750 and 751 (aka the “Reach Codes) for a variety of reasons including:

1)      Because the impact of these proposed ordinance affects all of Piedmont’s property owners, I believe it would be very welcomed and appropriate for the city to make a special effort to communicate these proposed ordinances to all Piedmont citizens.

2)      It’s my sense that a combination factors (e.g. COVID-19 and the summer season) results in a significant percentage of Piedmonters out of town and unaware of the Piedmont Posts’s  July 22nd reporting on the Reach Codes    In addition, those that have read the codes may find (as I do) that more time is needed to responsibly reflect upon the proposed ordinance and render productive feedback to our elected city leaders.

The benefits of achieving a broad awareness of the proposed Reach Codes, and the benefits of receiving constructive feedback from citizens and homeowners supports allowing more time before the second reading.

The text of the proposed ordinance can be found here:  https://piedmont.ca.gov/common/pages/DisplayFile.aspx?itemId=16846499

Thank you for your consideration

Dai Meagher, Piedmont Resident

Jul 21 2020

What is a Safe Social Distance?  Where did the 6 foot Rule Originate?

A Journal of the American Medical Association article by a particle fluid dynamicist at the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology suggests unmasked people might do well to stay more than 27 feet apart (8.2 meters) to avoid infecting one another.  It finds “wearing of appropriate personal protection equipment is vitally important for health care workers caring for patients who may be infected, even if they are farther than 6 feet away from a patient.”  See American Medical Association article here.

The World Health Organization recommends three-feet is wide enough social distancing based on the 1930s practice in treating tuberculosis.  But in 2003 it was found that SARS infections were communicated between people six feet apart—not three.  See December 2003 New England Journal of Medicine article here.

All of these distance reports focused on droplets, which fall.  However, the much smaller aerosols linger and move through the air as they are evaporating.

The Alameda County Public Health Officer ordered face coverings be worn at all times in public, if you are or are likely to be within 30 feet of another person outside of your household:

A person does not need to wear a Face Covering when outdoors alone or with a member of their Social Bubble and they have a Face Covering visible and immediately ready to cover the nose and mouth (such as hanging around their neck) and nobody else (other member of their own Social Bubble) is outdoors within 30 feet (10 yards) of them. It is recommended that people from the same household or living unit wear a Face Covering when outside, even if others are not nearby, any time others may appear without much notice.

Read the Alameda County Public Health Officer order on face coverings here.

On June 18, 2020  California’s Governor Newsom declared Californians must wear face masks in public under State coronavirus order.  A few days later the Governor threatened to withhold $2.5 billion in the upcoming budget from local governments if they don’t enforce the state’s orders on wearing masks, testing and other measures in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. 

Jul 21 2020

City of Piedmont Joins a Coalition to Oppose FCC Wireless Communications Facilities Rule

At its meeting on July 20, 2020, the Piedmont City Council joined a coalition to oppose new Federal Communications Commission rules regarding wireless communications facilities. The new rule, approved by the FCC on June 9, 2020 significantly reduces the already limited decision making power held by local governments to minimize the impact of wireless communication facilities on their communities.

“We believe there are ways for wireless communication devices to be deployed in an aesthetically appropriate manner. Unfortunately, the FCC seems intent on making that much more difficult, if not impossible,” said Kevin Jackson, Director of Planning and Building. “So unless there is a court-ordered injunction, the new FCC rules will further reduce Piedmont’s ability to control the installation of wireless communication facilities.”

Section 6409 of the Spectrum Act requires a city like Piedmont to approve an “eligible facilities request” for a modification of an existing wireless tower or base station that does not “substantially change” the physical dimensions of such tower or base station.

The FCC has changed the definition of “substantial change,” as well as other important changes. Changes in the new Eligible Facilities order include, but are not limited to:

  •  The 60-day shot clock is now triggered when the applicant takes the first procedural steps, giving the city less time to review for the compliance with the City’s codes.
  • The definition of concealment has been narrowed so that concealment is only “stealth” design, e.g. look like something other than a wireless tower or base station. Now under the new FCC order, concealment of a facility at a specific location would not include screening by a rooftop or placement behind a tree line or fence.
  • In addition, the FCC order specifies that aesthetic requirements originally imposed as conditions of approval, such as vegetation cover, fencing, screening, and similar requirements will not be grounds to deny an expressly allowed height or size increase.
  • The order allows the installation of additional antenna up to 20 feet, plus there is no cap to the height of new antenna, for towers outside the public right-of-way.
  • On an existing structure such as a utility pole, the FCC made modifications to the number of equipment cabinets that can be installed per an eligible facilities request.

For more information, please contact Director of Planning and Building Kevin Jackson at kjackson@piedmont.ca.gov.

Jul 4 2020

From late May through July 2, 2020 Piedmont’s Confirmed Positive Covid 19 Test Results remained at a total of 13.  On July 3 an additional reported case brought the total to 14.  Some joggers, bikers, skateboarders, dog walkers, and others are still out and about in Piedmont without face coverings despite the Governor’s threat to withhold State funds from Cities that do not enforce masks/face coverings.

Our neighbor Oakland’s total has continued to grow, reaching  2,587 Confirmed Positive Covid 19 Test Results as of July 3.

The Coronavirus Tracker of the Bay Area reports daily the latest Positive tests.  Follow the numbers daily here.

Jul 1 2020

At its regular meeting on July 6th at 7:30 p.m., the Piedmont City Council will consider the first reading of an ordinance implementing “reach codes,” which are amendments to state’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards and state Electrical Code, which are designed to promote efficient building methods in homes in Piedmont.

Electric Appliances – Electric Heating – Home Energy Audits required prior to listing a home for sale or applying for a Design Review permit

The Council will also consider an ordinance requiring home energy audits under certain circumstances. Click to read the Agenda Report for this item, [Adobe Reader required]which includes the proposed ordinances, as well as links to background documents and details on the public outreach.

These measures are being proposed because Piedmont’s Climate Action Plan (CAP) 2.0 calls for the community to reduce its annual greenhouse gas emissions from the building, transportation, waste, and wastewater sectors, combined, from about 38,000 metric tons of CO2e in 2017 to just 9,800 metric tons in 2050. Currently, a large percentage of Piedmont’s emissions come from natural gas appliances in buildings, especially gas furnaces and water heaters. To meet CAP goals, the Piedmont community must decrease natural gas use in buildings by improving insulation, and by switching out natural gas appliances for electric appliances powered by renewable energy.

The specific proposed requirements are as follows:

  • Newly constructed low-rise residential buildings, including new detached accessory dwelling units (ADUs), must use all electric building appliances.
  • Projects proposing an entire new upper level on a low-rise residential building, or that increase a low-rise residential building’s total roof area by 30% or more, are required to install solar panels on their roof.
  • A housing renovation on a low-rise residential building, that costs $25,000 or more, will require the applicant to include one item from a list of energy efficient insulation or electrification fixes (renovations of $100,000 or more must include two). Multiple items are cost-effective.

The City Council will also consider other amendments to the Building Code and policy changes that, while not Reach Codes, will also help reduce natural gas use. They are:

  • An application for an electrical panel upgrade must include space in the panel to accommodate future electrification of all building appliances.
  • Kitchen and laundry area renovations must include electrical outlets to allow for future electrification.
  • Requiring completion of a Home Energy Score or Audit (homeowner’s choice) when listing for sale of a property or submitting an application for a design review permit.

The proposed code amendments were drafted following extensive public outreach – including two public surveys and five public outreach forums – significant research, and collaboration with East Bay Community Energy and several cost-effectiveness analysts.

Members of the public are encouraged to participate by submitting comments and attending the Council meeting. Comments regarding the proposed code amendments may be sent to the City Council via email to: citycouncil@piedmont.ca.gov. To send comments via U.S. Mail, please use the following address: Piedmont City Council c/o City Clerk, 120 Vista Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611.

If you have questions about the proposed ordinances and policy, please contact Planning & Building Director Kevin Jackson by email at kjackson@piedmont.ca.gov. Any correspondence sent to the City will be considered a public record.

Jun 30 2020

Alameda County Public Health Department Effective June 8, 2020 and valid until replaced, amended, or rescinded: Health Officer Order with updated Face Covering guidelines for Alameda County.

Summary of the Face Covering Order:

This order generally requires wearing Face Coverings when people are outside their homes, and is intended to provide simple rules that we must all follow in the months to come. Widespread use of Face Coverings is a critical part of reducing the spread of COVID-19.

Per the Order, everyone over the age of 12 should wear a Face Covering when outside their home and within 30 feet of anyone else other than members of their Social Bubble

City of Piedmont:  “We owe it to each other to wear a face covering! We are all working towards the common goal of not spreading the Covid-19 virus, and as cases have increased across the nation, we must do all we can to prevent increased numbers in Piedmont. Alameda County’s updated face covering order issued on June 5th mandates that face coverings be worn at all times in public, if you are or are likely to be within 30 feet of another person outside of your household. Always have a face covering with you when you leave the house, and wear it. We’re all in this together.” 

For more detailed information, please see the Alameda County Public Health Department website. 

http://www.acphd.org/media/584316/alameda-county-health-officer-order-20-13-english.pdf

http://www.acphd.org/media/584409/press-release-2020.06.05.pdf

Jun 26 2020

Locations proposed for electric vehicle (EV) charging stations are 4 parking spaces in the Piedmont Community Center parking lot, one parking space near Havens School on Highland Avenue, and 2 parking spaces near ACE hardware on Grand Avenue.

Park Commission Wednesday, July 1 will make a recommendation to the City Council on converting  parking spaces to EV charging stations.

The Piedmont Park Commission will meet on Wednesday, July 1 at 5:30 pm via ZOOM Teleconference.

The agenda:

1. Approval of Park Commission Minutes for June 3, 2020

2. Update from the Piedmont Unified School District Regarding Phase 2 Construction at Piedmont High School and Discussion on New Street Trees in Coordination with the City of Piedmont

3. Consideration of a Recommendation to City Council to Install Electric Vehicle Charging Stations in the Civic Center and Grand Avenue Commercial District in Conjunction with East Bay Community Energy.

  [East Bay Community Energy charges $0.28 per kWh, limits charging to 4 hours and requires the City or private entity to police the occupancy of the charging stations. see below]

4. Update on the Impacts of the COVID19 Emergency on City Parks, Open Spaces, and Landscape Maintenance Regulations

5. Monthly Maintenance Report: Park, Open Space, and Street Tree Update for the Month of June

East Bay Community Energy EV Charging Station Policy

  • A flat rate fee of $0.28 per kWh will be charged for the use of the station.
  • There is a four (4) hour time limit for charging at the EV station. Violators may be subject to towing at owner’s expense.
  • Vehicles parked in EV station spaces MUST be connected to the charging station. Violators may be subject to towing at owner’s expense.

State of California law on EV’s (AB 475 Butler)

“Electric vehicles (EV’s) must be plugged in for refueling when occupying an EV designated parking space, otherwise they may be towed. In addition, the law prohibits a person from obstructing, blocking, or otherwise barring access to an EV-designated parking space.”

Click the red link below to:

Learn how to participate in the July 1 Park Commission meeting 

Read the minutes of the prior meeting

View the maps of charging station locations near Havens School,  Community Center Parking Lot, and Grand Avenue.

View Piedmont produced video and read questionnaire.

PCA Park Commission Agenda_2020-07-01