Jan 6 2022
The first item on today’s (January 6, 2022) PAC agenda is a briefing on the scope of facilities allowed under Measure UU.
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Can Measure UU bonds be used for just pool facilities or other recreational activities/services?  

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This seems a more appropriate question for the Bond Oversight Committee, but in any event, a brief staff report would help the public to understand staff’s interpretation, but none is provided for today’s meeting. That interpretation may be best understood from a use survey for the new facility (link below). Multipurpose rooms, cardio gyms and a cafe all appear to be permitted under UU. 
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https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/piedmontcommunitypoolprogramming
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Measure UU language and the City Attorney analysis of the measure are provided below. I think the key language is “new pool facilities” and many of those uses in the survey are not related to a pool facility. 
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Measure UU
“Shall the measure to prevent permanent closure of Piedmont’s Community Pool by constructing new pool facilities, restrooms and related areas, to conserve energy and water, provide greater community access and safety, and authorize Piedmont to issue $19,500,000 in bonds at legal rates, generating $1,257,950 annually at an average rate of 2.6 cents per $100 of assessed valuation while bonds are outstanding, with all money staying local and independent citizens’ oversight, be adopted?”
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City Attorney Analysis of UU 
“Measure UU limits the principal amount of the bonds to no more than $19,500,000 and provides that interest rates on the bonds would be capped at a maximum of 12%, but the prevailing market rates could be less. The bonds would be secured by ad valorem taxes levied on taxable real property in the City. The City estimates that the levy of taxes to repay the bonds would be at an average rate of 2.6 cents per $100 of the assessed valuation. The tax would only be assessed if the bonds are issued and the actual tax rate shall be subject to variation during the duration of the repayment period. Proceeds of the bonds may only be used for the design and construction of improvements for the Piedmont Community Pool and adjacent areas. Measure UU includes accountability requirements including that bond proceeds shall be deposited in a separate account created and held by the City solely for financing the authorized improvements. In addition, the measure also requires the Finance Director to file a report with the City Council at least annually showing the amount of bond proceeds collected and expended, and the status of improvements. Measure UU would also require the City Council to establish and appoint members to an oversight committee, which would have responsibility for reviewing and reporting on the expenditure of the proceeds of the bonds.”
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Garrett Keating, Former City Council Member
Jan 4 2022

Special Planning Commission Agenda Monday, January 10, 2022 6:00 p.m. Via Teleconference

Regular Agenda

1. Presentation on the Piedmont Community Pool Project.

2. Presentation on Senate Bill 9 Related to Housing.

READ THE FULL AGENDA FOR PARTICIPATION DETAILS BY CLICKING BELOW:

January 2022 PC Agenda

Contact the Planning Department for additional information at:

510-420-3050

Dec 7 2021

Bond Oversight Committee Application Deadline is Wednesday, December 8th at 5:00 p.m.

On Thursday, November 18, 2021, the City of Piedmont successfully priced $19.5 million in General Obligation Bonds to rebuild the now defunct Piedmont Community Pool pursuant to voter- approved Measure UU. Tax Exempt bonds such as these are often sold at a discount or a premium depending on the interest rate environment. Current conditions have allowed the $19.5 million par amount of the bonds to yield approximately $24 million in project proceeds as investors are willing to pay more than the face value of the bonds to get a better interest rate. The bond proceeds and the resulting debt service are in alignment with the projections in the Measure UU materials and at a lower tax rate than voters approved.

Since June of 2020, staff has advised the City Council, the Budget Advisory and Financial Planning Committee, and the community that the proceeds would likely exceed the sale amount of the bonds. The favorable climate for bonds is a benefit to Piedmonters, especially in the current construction environment, with costs for projects such as these rising sharply since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The available proceeds will allow a healthy contingency to buffer rising construction costs, supply chain issues, and inflation.

Pricing the bonds fixes the interest rate to maturity, which eliminates the City’s exposure to rate fluctuations. The annual tax rate to repay the bonds is expected to be no more than $25.40 cents per $100,000 of assessed value, which is lower than the $26.20 cents per $100,000 tax rate estimate contained in Measure UU. The bonds are expected to be delivered and the funds received by the City on December 8th.

Residents interested in serving on the Bond Oversight Committee are invited to submit their application on the City web site at > https://p1cdn4static.civiclive.com/UserFiles/Servers/Server_13659739/File/Government/Commissions%20and%20Committees/Recruitment/BOC_Application.pdf.     The application deadline is Wednesday, December 8th at 5:00 p.m. Interviews for the Committee will be held at a special City Council meeting on Monday, December 13th.

The project budget, which is different from available proceeds, is currently under development during refinement of the 2016 conceptual master plan with the project architect and the community. The City Council will make the final decision on a project budget. If the project is constructed at a cost less than available proceeds, the unspent bond monies will be used to pay debt service on the bonds thereby reducing the overall burden on Piedmont’s taxpayer.

Nov 20 2021

Who is fighting to stop the State takeover of local land use planning?

California residents, including Piedmonters, are becoming more and more aware of the loss of control over local land use planning in their cities and neighborhoods. Public interest groups are forming to fight State takeover of local planning processes.

Developers are projected to be the monetary gainers of State control over housing and planning.

The continuing loss of local citizens’ ability to control development and feel confident of their community’s future is felt and shown in the number of homeowners deciding this is the time to leave California. 

To date, the Piedmont City Council has fully supported the Piedmont Regional Housing Need Assessments (RHNA) calling for an additional 587 housing units added in Piedmont.  Proposals call for the Piedmont Planning Department to ministerially take action on approvals without neighborhood input on Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) that meet certain criteria. Areas in Piedmont, including a park, are  being considered to be designated for multiple housing units. 

State legislation impacts Piedmont’s two “single family” residential zones differently.   Zone A where smaller parcels are typically found in “lower Piedmont,” there is a requirement of a 5 foot setback from side and rear property lines for habitable buildings.  Zone E (Estate), an elite zone where parcels are generally located in upper Piedmont,  require more space  around their homes for the greater 20 foot side and rear yard setbacks.   Roof overhangs are allowed into the setbacks further narrowing the distance between buildings.  Zone E has been questioned as illegally established as never having been established by voter action per the City Charter . 

The required number of RHNA housing units was assigned to Piedmont without consideration of the numerous substandard, narrow, and winding road ways impacting safety and emergency vehicles.   Deficient municipal open space, lack of local employment, and other local problems were also not factored into Piedmont’s 587 new housing unit assessment.

Various groups opposing State imposition of housing requirements are linked below for information.

 www.stopsacramento.org
https://www.livablecalifornia.org/livable-california-endorses-the-our-neighborhood-voices-initiative/
Nov 20 2021

Community Advisory Committee is composed of individuals associated with the School District to “strengthen community and positive relationships amongst our various stakeholders.”

Randall Booker, Superintendent, November 10, 2021,  SUPERINTENDENT’S COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE – UPDATED

I. SUPPORT INFORMATION

At the April 28, 2021 Board of Education Meeting, Naomi Hunter, Communications Consultant presented the results of the District’s Pandemic Response Survey. The presentation can be viewed here. Ms. Hunter provided several recommendations to improve communications across the district and community.

  • – Hire Communications Director (1.0FTE)
  • – Establish Communications goals (21-22) related to surveying, social media engagement, Piedmont Ahead publications, quarterly departmental communication updates (Tech, SPED, Curriculum & Instruction, Facilities), etc.
  • – Member of the Superintendent’s Cabinet to provide ongoing assistance and guidance in communicating both strategic and tactical initiatives.
  • – Contract to redevelop the PUSD Website.
  • – Schedule standing APT Liaison Committee Meetings between the Board, Administrative Team, and the Association of Piedmont Teachers to strengthen communication, shared understanding, and collaborative efforts to support students and educators.
  • – Develop and schedule Supt. Advisory Committee Meetings for 21-22 that include students, educators, and parents.

The District has moved forward with each of these initiatives for the 21-22 school year and will launch the Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee in December, with monthly meetings to follow.

Background on the Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee

The Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee was introduced initially at the October 27, 2021 Board of Education Meeting. The Board and community provided input around the membership of the community which led to changes in the roster (see below). Superintendent will collaborate with the Parent Club presidents and the PEF Director to solicit parent involvement that is wide-reaching. Building off of the success of a variety of Superintendent committees (Facilities Steering, Budget Advisory, Health and Safety Steering, etc.), the purpose of the Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee is to:

● strengthen community and positive relationships amongst our various stakeholders;

● listen, learn, and better understand one another on the various successes and areas to improve across the District;

● generate ideas to improve communications, district-wide operations, and the student and staff learning/working environment.

Membership

The Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee will consist of the following membership (25 people in total):

  • 1. Superintendent
  • 2. Director of Communication and Community Relations
  • 3. (2) APSA Members: 1 Certificated / 1 Classified
  • 4. (2) Certificated Staff Members (APT): 1 Elementary / 1 Secondary
  • 5. (2) Classified Staff Members (CSEA): 1 Elementary / 1 Secondary
  • 6. (2) Board of Education Members
  • 7. (8) Parents of current PUSD students – 1 per school site, 2 at-large
  • 8. (6) Students (2 PMS, 2 MHS, 2 PHS)
  • 9. PEF Executive Director APSA, APT, and CSEA will choose their own members to participate. PMS, PHS, and MHS ASB will choose their own members. Each school site Parent Club will appoint a respective community member for participation. Notes will be drafted and published for the Piedmont Community.

Meeting Dates/Times* 3:45pm – 5:15pm Dec. 6th Jan. 10th Feb. 28th Mar. 14th Apr. 4th * All meetings will be held virtually via Google Meet until further notice.

II. RECOMMENDATION: INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION Review the proposed Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee.

 

PCA Board Background on Updated Superintendent’s Community Advisory Committee 11-10-2021_184416sckde3ggtq0by5dhsh2fdlkk

Board Meeting Summary – 11-10-21.docx

Oct 3 2021

Two million six hundred sixty three thousand and seven hundred twenty nine dollars are Piedmont’s share of the COVID American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funds

On Monday, October 4, 2021, the Piedmont City Council will consider how to spend the $2,663,729 in windfall funds arising from  the Federal government to assist with costs.  Read the AGENDA here.

The priority list developed by the Piedmont staff is listed below.

Approve the attached resolution allocating the City’s American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funds as follows:

A. Devote lost revenue funds to address urgent facilities projects, prioritized as follows:

1. Dispatch Center Relocation\Remodel

2. Initiation of Master Planning Process for the future of Police Department, Fire Department and City Hall

3. One or a combination of the following:

  • City Hall Basement:
  • Digitization of Residential Property Files and Remodel Office Space ·
  • Fire Department Living Quarters Renovation
  • Recreation Department Building Renovation

B. Devote the remaining more restricted funds as follows:

1. Cover the City’s direct COVID-19 related expenses incurred after March 3, 2021

2. Provide premium pay to certain Recreation Department childcare personnel who were exposed on a daily basis to critical health risks while interacting with the public due to the nature of their jobs

3. Provide COVID-19 specific support to the Piedmont Unified School District by providing $100,000 toward funding a temporary full-time school nurse to assist PUSD in its COVID-19 response. Such resource would be available to support the City’s Recreation Department COVID-19 response needs as well.

Read the full October 4, 2021 staff report below:

COVID FUNDS 102021

https://piedmont.ca.gov/common/pages/DisplayFile.aspx?itemId=18049031

Comment links to Piedmont City Councilmembers:

Mayor Teddy King

tking@piedmont.ca.gov
(510) 420-3048

Vice Mayor Tim Rood

trood@piedmont.ca.gov
(510) 239-7663

Councilmember Jen Cavenaugh

jcavenaugh@piedmont.ca.gov
(415) 215-6933

Councilmember Betsy Smegal Andersen

bandersen@piedmont.ca.gov
(510) 420-3048

Councilmember Conna McCarthy

cmccarthy@piedmont.ca.gov
(510) 420-3048

Oct 3 2021

Piedmont voters in March 2020 approved Measure UU the $19.5 million Piedmont bond measure levied against Piedmont real properties. 

The monies are to be used to develop and construct new municipal pools and an aquatic center.  A requirement of the ballot measure is the establishment of an oversight committee.  A resolution is to be considered by the City Council on October 4 to determine how the chairperson of the committee is chosen, the number of committee members, reporting requirements, oversight charges, etc.

Like the Budget Advisory and Financial Planning Committee (BAFPC), who will have a slot on the bond oversight committee, no written minutes or video archiving of the meetings are required within the resolution.  Release of information is restricted by the Council resolution.  Minutes have never been provided by the somewhat obscure BAFPC. Consequently, it appears those interested in the bond oversight committee and meetings will need to participate in real time during the meetings. 

There is no requirement for conflict of interest filings by committee members to be able to participate on the committee.

Below is a partial list of the committee member requirements.

SECTION 4. The Community Pool Bond Oversight Committee shall consist of five residents at large, including one current or former member of the Budget Advisory and Financial Planning Committee.

SECTION 5. The City Council shall appoint one member to serve as Committee Chair.

SECTION 6. The Community Pool Bond Oversight Committee shall meet at least two times per year or more frequently as the Committee deems it necessary to discharge its duty, but no more frequently than quarterly. At the end of each meeting, the Committee shall identify the next approximate meeting date.

SECTION 7. The term of the Community Pool Bond Oversight Committee shall extend from the date of establishment to the Committee’s submission of the final Annual Report which reflects the final accounting of the expenditure of the Bond proceeds.

SECTION 8. The Community Pool Bond Oversight Committee shall comply with the Ralph M. Brown Act (Government Code §54950 et seq.) including, but not limited to notice, agenda posting, and public participation requirements.

SECTION 9. The Community Pool Bond Oversight Committee is an advisory body to the City Council and is not an independent decision-making body. All of its recommendations are subject to approval of the City Council

READ THE ENTIRE RESOLUTION IN THE COMPLETE STAFF REPORT LINKED  BELOW.

>Pool Bond Com 102021

AGENDA OF OCT. 4, 2021 COUNCIL MEETING > HERE.

Sep 22 2021

SCHOOLS, RECREATION, BUILDING RENOVATIONS, CITY MASTER PLAN, PUBLIC SAFETY AND MORE –

On Thursday, September 23. 2021 at 4:00 p.m.. the Piedmont Budget Advisory and Financial Planning Committee will meet via Zoom to consider a recommendation to the Piedmont City Council on how to spend $2,663,729, Piedmont’s COVID funds. 

To participate and view the meeting see the Agenda link below.

Of the $2,663,729 allocated to the City, $2,382,545 is tied to lost revenue and can be used in category 3 which, as noted in the full staff report linked below, may be used for any governmental services, including infrastructure projects. The remaining $281,183 must be used in accordance with the provisions of the other four categories.

STAFF RECOMMENDATION:

By motion, recommend that the City Council allocate the City’s American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funds as proposed by staff:

A. Devote lost revenue funds to address urgent facilities projects, prioritized as follows:

1. Dispatch Center Relocation\Remodel

2. Initiation of Master Planning Process for the Future of Police, Fire and City Hall

3. City Hall Basement: Digitization of Residential Property Files and Remodel Office Space

3. Fire Department Living Quarters Renovation 3. Recreation Department Building Renovation

B. Devote the remaining more restricted funds as follows:

1. Cover the City’s direct COVID related expenses incurred after March 3, 2021

2. Provide premium pay to Recreation Department personnel who were exposed on a daily basis to critical health risks while interacting with the public due to the nature of their jobs

3. Provide COVID-19 specific support to the Piedmont Unified School District by providing funding toward a temporary full-time school nurse to assist PUSD in its COVID-19 response. Such resource would be available to support the City’s Recreation Department COVID response needs as well.

AGENDA >2021-09-23 Budget Advisory and Financial Planning Committee Agenda

READ  FULL STAFF REPORT >2021-09-23 ARPA Funding Direction – BAFPC

Sep 15 2021

On Tuesday, September 13th, the City began the process of draining the 154,000 gallons of water out of the main pool. Check out the video to see the progress and to hear more about the Piedmont Community Pool project.  The speaker is John Tulloch, City Clerk. 

Click on the arrow below to see the Piedmont Community Pool being drained, thus ending the water leakage. 

Piedmont Community Pool Project Update
Aug 10 2021
NEW: SENIOR MEET-UP GROUPS

Announcement:

The Piedmont Recreation Department (PRD) is creating community through our new Senior Meet-up Groups!

A meet-up is simply that—a group people that meet up to enjoy a common interest. Do you want to practice speaking French? Are you an avid bird watcher? Meet new people while playing, exploring, creating and doing the things you love. PRD will help promote and even supply your group with a meeting room.

Various ideas for Meet-up Groups!

Art Enthusiasts: Meet at different museums

Chess Club: Check mate!

Dog Lovers: Meet at various dog-friendly hikes

Documentary Scholars: Watch a documentary and discuss

Pickballers: Schedule a weekly pick-up game

Poker Night: Just don’t let it get ‘out of hand’

These are just a few of the ideas PRD came up with…e-mail > Eva Phalen and let PRD  know what activities you enjoy!

 To phone the Piedmont Recreation Department – call 510/420-3070